Daily Archives for: February 21st, 2016

Encore: A Journal of the Eightieth Year by May Sarton (1993)

From the 1993 W.W. Norton edition of Encore: A Journal of the Eightieth Year by May Sarton: In this affirmative new journal May Sarton describes both hardships and joys in the daily round — physical struggles counterbalanced by the satisfactions of friendship, nature, growing fame, and a return to writing poetry. Sarton writes perceptively of how age affects her: the way small things take longer and tire more, how the body often hurts and feels fragile and scared.

Other days energy returns, spirits lift, projects abound. She returns to the garden — and her descriptions of flowers have never been more luminous. She savors particular pleasures, from good soup to the friends who come and help keep everything going. Read More→


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The Story Girl by L.M. Montgomery (1911)

From the 1990 Avenel edition of Days of Dreams and Laughter: The Story Girl and Other Tales by Lucy Maud Montgomery. The Story Girl by L.M. Montgomery  was first published in 1911.

“Never had we heard a voice like hers,” says the young narrator, describing the first meeting with Sara Stanley, “The Story Girl.”

So begins a merry journey into the hearts and lives of a close-knit group of Canadian teenagers. the heroine and her young companions, like Anne of Green Gables, are blessed with humor, spunk, a strong sense of adventure, and romantic souls.

The Story Girl has Sara Stanley at its center, skillfully weaving stories that fascinate listeners while incorporating subtle lessons in friendship, love, and life. Through her magical talents, she becomes each character she tells of, so enthralling listeners so that they believe that one day she will be “destined to stand before kings.” Her mastery of language and sense of drama are what make each story so appealing. Read More→


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Portrait of a Marriage by Pearl S. Buck (1941)

From the 1941 John Day edition of Portrait of a Marriage by Pearl S. Buck. “Marriage is so profound an experience,” William Wrote to his grown daughter, “I should be sorry if you missed it. It takes place sometimes between two who are unsuited, but it is profound.”

Surely no two could have seemed less suited than he and Ruth — he a sensitive artist, son of a rich and proud family, widely traveled, cosmopolitan, and she the unlettered daughter daughter of a farmer. She could never come into his world, and he came into hers — giving up, for their deep love, his family and fame and almost all else he had known. Yet at the end of nearly fifty years he could think, with gratitude to her, how rich his life had been, how little he had lost to gain happiness. Read More→


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